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Individual dental insurance provides you with the coverage you need to promote good dental health in which you can generally find customized options. That means you may have some work cut out for you as you shop our web site. For example, in California we offer over 65 dental plans to choose from which beats looking through that many places. Keep in mind individual plans is just a term used to distinguish itself from group plans which you generally get from your employer. Since obtaining an individual dental insurance plan is very affordable, many people choose to take responsibility for that coverage either as a stand-alone policy or as a supplement to their group dental coverage.

National Cancer Institute (NCI) Acting Director Douglas Lowy, M.D., today accepted the recommendations of a Blue Ribbon Panel (BRP) on 10 scientific approaches most likely to make a decade’s worth of progress against cancer in five years under the Cancer Moonshot. The report was presented by the BRP to the National Cancer Advisory Board (NCAB), and it was subsequently considered and accepted by the NCAB with revisions that reflect the NCAB’s discussion. An overview of the report (link is external) was published today in the journal Science.

Contestants will vie for $20 million in prizes to develop new innovative laboratory diagnostic tools that detect and distinguish antibiotic resistant bacteria.

Washington, DC – A federal prize competition launched is calling for innovative ideas for rapid, point-of-care laboratory diagnostic tests to combat the development and spread of drug resistant bacteria, a rising public health threat. Antibiotic resistant bacteria cause at least 2 million infections and 23,000 deaths each year in the United States, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The Basics

Dental insurance coverage for college students is often undervalued.  College student dental insurance plans are generally a great financial help when a son or daughter goes to a university and is no longer covered by the family insurance plan.  Student dental insurance will be an important part of securing health care for a pupil, especially  if there has been a history of problems in the past.  Parents and students will need to review several student dental insurance policies.  Gather information on student dental insurance is just the beginning of learning about practical living and budgets.  The Internet can be a good place to begin research for college student dental insurance plans and policies especially at InsuranceCompany.com

ADNI adds novel methods for recruitment, testing disease risk.   The Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) — the long-running National Institutes of Health-supported study investigating brain and fluid biomarkers of the disease — enters a new phase of discovery with the launch of ADNI3. With the recent NIH award of approximately $40 million over the next five years—coupled with anticipated private sector contributions of $20 million through the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health (FNIH) — ADNI3 will use cutting-edge technologies in brain imaging as it recruits hundreds of new volunteers. Expansion of the groundbreaking study, now in its 12th year, will further develop ways to speed clinical trials by providing researchers the biomarkers needed to detect the onset and track the progression of Alzheimer’s disease.

 

Bruxism or other wise know as teeth grinding, is a serious dental issue that needs to be address by your dentist. Teeth grinding can wear teeth down over time, as well as chip or crack your teeth. It is most often caused by stress and sleeping habits, which can make this dental issue hard to control. Avoiding hard foods during the day can reduce pain and damage from this habit. Wearing a mouth guard at night can prevent the damage caused by grinding while sleeping.

An “incorrect” assumption that fear and anxiety are mediated in the brain by a single “fear circuit” has stalled progress in developing better treatments for anxiety disorders, argue two leading experts. Designing future research based on a “two-system” framework holds promise for improving treatment outcomes, say Daniel Pine, M.D., a clinical researcher in the NIMH Emotion and Development Branch, and Joseph LeDoux, Ph.D. , a basic scientist and NIMH grantee at New York University

The long-held approach to predicting seasonal influenza vaccine effectiveness may need to be revisited, new research suggests. Currently, seasonal flu vaccines are designed to induce high levels of protective antibodies against hemagglutinin (HA), a protein found on the surface of the influenza virus that enables the virus to enter a human cell and initiate infection. New research conducted by scientists at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, found that higher levels of antibody against a different flu surface protein — neuraminidase (NA) — were the better predictor of protection against flu infection and its unpleasant side effects. Neuraminidase, which is not currently the main target antigen in traditional flu vaccines, enables newly formed flu viruses to exit the host cell and cause further viral replication in the body.

In light of serious problems identified in the NIH Clinical Center Pharmaceutical Development Section last year, NIH launched a multifaceted effort to ensure that processes for patient safety and quality of care at the hospital are of the highest standards.  Accordingly, NIH hired two companies specializing in quality assurance for manufacturing and compounding — Working Buildings and Clinical IQ — to evaluate all of its facilities producing sterile or infused products for administration to research participants.  This evaluation is underway and preliminary findings have identified facilities not in compliance with quality and safety standards, and not suitable for the production of sterile or infused products.  As a result, production has been suspended in two facilities: a National Cancer Institute laboratory engaged in cell therapy production and a National Institute of Mental Health facility producing positron emission tomography (PET) materials.

A new study has found that drinking water from private wells, particularly dug wells established during the first half of the 20th century, may have contributed to the elevated risk of bladder cancer that has been observed in Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont for over 50 years. Other risk factors for bladder cancer, such as smoking and occupational exposures, did not explain the excess risk in this region. The study, by researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the National Institutes of Health, and colleagues at the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Hanover, New Hampshire; the departments of health for Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont; and the U.S. Geological Survey, appeared May 2, 2016, in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

Bladder cancer mortality rates have been elevated in northern New England for over half a century. The incidence of bladder cancer in Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont has been about 20 percent higher than that in the United States overall. Rates are elevated among both men and women. A unique feature of this region is the high proportion of the population using private wells for their drinking water, which are not maintained by municipalities and are not subject to federal regulations. These wells may contain arsenic, generally at low to moderate levels. Previous studies have shown that consumption of water containing high concentrations of arsenic increases the risk of bladder cancer.

In a study of nearly 650 people with the eye disease age-related macular degeneration (AMD), half still had vision 20/40 or better, typically good enough to drive or to read standard print, after five years of treatment with anti-VEGF drugs that are injected into the eye. The authors of the study, funded by the National Eye Institute (NEI) at the National Institutes of Health, say those outcomes would have been unimaginable about 10 years ago, prior to the drugs’ availability.

The results were published in the journal Ophthalmology and presented May 2nd at the annual meeting of the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology (ARVO) in Seattle.

Aetna, United Health Care, Primecare and Delta Dental  

Dental health insurance is the insurance that covers expenses related to treating dental problems and is available through various dental insurance companies such as Aetna, United Health Care, Primecare, Delta Dental and others. Dental health insurance is available for individuals, small businesses, and families as well.  Dental health insurance plans are one way of ensuring individuals and families get regular dental check ups. There are several different types of dental health insurance plans, but there are four kinds that are most commonly purchased. Finally, these types of plans are much different than discount dental plans because they are indemnity plans, capitation programs or schedule-of-allowance programs

Shop And Save By Buying Online

The first company to enable individuals to both comparison-shop and apply for dental health insurance and discount protection directly via the Internet.  Medicarecard. com is a provider of free quotes and advice for buying dental health insurance and discount plans that provide group, family and individual coverage.  There also are other dental health insurance key terms, such as predetermination of costs and annual benefits limitations.

A direct reimbursement dental health insurance plan reimburses participants on the amount they spend on any dental service rather than covering the type of service performed.  In dental health insurance, usual, customary and reasonable (UCR) is used to determine how much of the cost of a dental service an insurance company will agree to pay.

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On World Asthma Day 2016, the National Institutes of Health reaffirms its commitment to support research to improve the lives of all people with asthma. NIH-funded research has advanced our understanding of asthma as a disease as well as the impact asthma has on the lives of those affected.  We have made great strides in learning how to treat and prevent asthma, and we are committed to ensuring that scientific discoveries move quickly into clinical practice to provide the best possible care for all people with asthma.

Asthma is a chronic disease that intermittently inflames and narrows the airways. People with asthma may experience wheezing, breathlessness, chest tightness and coughing when the airways narrow. Roughly 300 million people worldwide live with this condition, including approximately 24 million in the United States. In the United States, asthma is a major contributing factor to missed time from school and work, and is also a major cause of hospitalization and emergency department visits.

Through the use of powerful genomic techniques, researchers at the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS) have found that the development of immune cells, called innate lymphoid cells (ILCs), gradually prepares these cells for rapid response to infection. This work, which appeared online today in Cell, sheds light on the development and function of a cell type that is increasingly recognized as having an important role in the body’s immune defense. NIAMS is part of the National Institutes of Health.

An experimental malaria vaccine protected a small number of healthy, malaria-naïve adults in the United States from infection for more than one year after immunization, according to results from a Phase 1 trial described in the May 9th issue of Nature Medicine. The vaccine, known as the PfSPZ Vaccine, was developed and produced by Sanaria Inc., of Rockville, Maryland, with support from several Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) awards from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health. NIAID researchers and collaborators at the University of Maryland School of Medicine in Baltimore, conducted the clinical evaluation of the vaccine, which involved immunization and exposing willing healthy adults to the malaria-causing parasite Plasmodium falciparum (P. falciparum) in a controlled setting.

Science Genetics Association Consortium (SSGAC) and supported in part by the National Institutes of Health, suggest that large genetics analyses may be able to help discover biological pathways as well.

The genome-wide association study (GWAS) was supported by the National Institute on Aging (NIA) and the Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research, both part of NIH, and appears in the May 11, 2016, issue of Nature.

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