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If the power is out for less than 4 hours, then the food in your refrigerator and freezer will be safe to consume. While the power is out, keep the refrigerator and freezer doors closed as much as possible to keep food cold for longer.

If the power is out for longer than 4 hours, follow the guidelines below:

* For the Freezer section: A freezer that is half full will hold food safely for up to 24 hours. A full freezer will hold food safely for 48 hours. Do not open the freezer door if you can avoid it.
* For the Refrigerated section: Pack milk, other dairy products, meat, fish, eggs, gravy, and spoilable leftovers into a cooler surrounded by ice. Inexpensive Styrofoam coolers are fine for this purpose.
* Use a food thermometer:  Check the temperature of your food right before you cook or eat it. Throw away any food that has a temperature of more than 40 degrees Fahrenheit.

Tips on what to know when your power goes out.

* To prevent carbon monoxide poisoning, use generators, pressure washers, grills, and similar items outdoors only.
*  If the power is out longer than two hours, throw away food that has a temperature higher than 40°F.
*  Check with local authorities to be sure your water is safe.
* In hot weather, stay cool and drink plenty of fluids to prevent heat-related illness.
* In cold weather, wear layers of clothing, which help to keep in body heat.
* Avoid downed power lines, if a power line falls on a car, you should stay inside the vehicle.

Blood pressure is the force of blood against the walls of the arteries. High blood pressure (hypertension) increases your chance of heart disease, and is dangerous because it often has no symptoms. Prevent high blood pressure by reducing sodium (salt) intake, being active, and keeping a healthy weight.

 

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Study suggests that people prone to developing allergies are going to develop an allergy to whatever is in their environment. In the largest, most comprehensive, nationwide study to examine the prevalence of allergies from early childhood to old age, scientists from the National Institutes of Health report that allergy prevalence is the same across different regions of the United States, except in children 5 years and younger.

This winter, much of the country has been in a deep freeze. With all the snow and ice, many people have spent a great deal of their time in the house. Besides just causing cabin fever, the condition of your home itself has a great effect on the health of you and the members of your family.

Here are some everyday things that could be causing health problems in your home. Read the rest of this post »

Due to loss of loved ones, health problems, trouble paying bills, or other reasons, many older adults may feel lonely, sad, low, or stressed. You may not feel like doing anything, not eat enough, or overeat. Being good to yourself may help you improve your “get up and go,” eating habits, and health.

Here are some ideas for being good to yourself:

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NIH network study suggests no added benefit from pelvic muscle exercise. Two surgical treatments for a form of pelvic hernia affecting women have similar rates of success and safety, scientists in a National Institutes of Health research network have found. A guided exercise therapy to strengthen pelvic muscles did not add to the benefits of either surgery

Healthy older adults generally do not need to check with a health care provider before becoming physically active. However, health care providers may be able to recommend types of exercise that are best for you and ways to progress at a safe and steady pace.

If you have a health issue or problem, you should talk with your health care provider to find out if there are any limits on what you can do. Your provider can help you plan for the types and amounts of exercise that are healthy for you.

NIH intramural-led study uncovers biology behind improper graft remodeling, points to treatment strategies. National Institutes of Health researchers have identified a biological pathway that contributes to the high rate of vein graft failure following bypass surgery. Using mouse models of bypass surgery, they showed that excess signaling via the Transforming Growth Factor Beta (TGF-Beta) family causes the inner walls of the vein become too thick, slowing down or sometimes even blocking the blood flow that the graft was intended to restore. Inhibition of the TGF-B signaling pathway reduced overgrowth in the grafted veins.

Being physically active is good for your overall health care, however just as important is to do so safely.  Here are some safety tips you should keep in mind.

*  Ask your health care provider about ways you can safely increase the amount of physical activity you do now.
*  Take time to warm up and cool down.
*  Start slowly and build up to more intense activity.
* Wear a sturdy pair of shoes.
* Stop if you have pain, become dizzy, or feel short of breath.
* Drink water.

The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) and the National Institute on Aging (NIA) at the National Institutes of Health remind older Americans about the importance of protecting their kidneys and urge them to better understand the decline of kidney function as people age.

Many people know that they want to do more physically active but do not know where to start. Here are a few tips that may help you get started.

* Pick an activity you enjoy and start with small, specific goals, such as “I will take three 10-minute walks this week.” Slowly increase the total amount of time and number of days you are active.

* If you live in an assisted living or retirement facility, ask if the fitness center offers a free health checkup and fitness program.

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Survival of patients with septic shock was the same regardless of whether they received treatment based on specific protocols or the usual high-level standard of care, according to a five-year clinical study. The large-scale randomized trial, named ProCESS for Protocolized Care for Early Septic Shock, was done in 31 academic hospital emergency departments across the country and was funded by the National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS), a component of the National Institutes of Health

Healthy older adults should do four types of activities regularly: aerobic (or endurance) exercise and activities to strengthen muscles, improve balance, and increase flexibility.

For any new physical activity, if you have not been active, start slowly and work up to your goal. To track your progress and stay motivated, keep a daily diary of what you do and how long you do it.

Many activities give you more than just one benefit! Water aerobics with weights gives you strengthening and aerobic benefits. Yoga combines balance, flexibility, and strengthening. Choose what you like to do—some physical activity is better than none.

The newest mental health data released by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration found that nearly 18 percent of Americans suffer from some form of mental illness.

The report shows national estimates of the prevalence of mental health disorders and mental health service use in the past year for youths between the ages of 12 and 17 and adults ages 18 and older.

Some findings from the survey include: Read the rest of this post »

Physical activity is good for your health at every age.  If you have never been active, starting regular physical activity now may improve your endurance, strength, balance, and flexibility. Being active may help you live on your own for a longer time and keep you healthy.

Being active can be hard if your mobility is limited or if you have serious health problems. But, you can find activities to meet your needs. Slowly raising your arms or legs, for example, may help you when done on a regular, repeated basis. Also speak to your doctor for recommended activities.

You may want to check with your health care provider or dentist if

* You find chewing difficult, don’t want to eat, or have trouble with your dentures.
* You feel that life events such as the death of a loved one or moving from your home are keeping you from eating well.
* You think your medicines may be making your food taste bad or affecting your appetite.
* You think you should take a daily vitamin like iron or vitamin C.

 

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