Despite hopes that higher blood levels of vitamin D might reduce cancer risk, a large study finds no protective effect against non-Hodgkin lymphoma or cancer of the endometrium, esophagus, stomach, kidney, ovary, or pancreas. In this study, carried out by researchers from the National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the National Institutes of Health, and many other research institutions, data based on blood samples originally drawn for 10 individual studies were combined to investigate whether people with high levels of vitamin D were less likely to develop these rarer cancers.

2 Responses to “Vitamin D Status is Not Associated with Risk for Less Common Cancers”

  • Terry H says:

    National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Funds Research to Improve Safety of Red Blood Cell Transfusions: The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), part of the National Institutes of Health, is funding nine research grants to determine if the safety and efficacy of red blood cell transfusions vary depending on how long the cells have been stored.

    One of the grants supports the first large, multi-center, randomized clinical trial to compare outcomes in heart surgery patients who receive transfusions of red blood cells that have been stored for shorter or longer amounts of time. The other eight research grants provide about $3.9 million per year over four years to assess the safety and efficacy of red blood cell transfusions.

  • Baut says:

    New Videos Reveal How NIH Identifies the Most Promising Research Applications: The National Institutes of Health’s Center for Scientific Review (CSR) today released a new video to show new applicants and others how NIH assesses over 80,000 grant applications each year to help find those with the most merit.

    With the majority of NIH’s $31 billion budget supporting grants to researchers, these assessments help ensure investments lead to significant advances in science and health.

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